One foot in front of the other: Walk Safely to School Day 2022

10 May 2022

Catholic school students are being encouraged to step out and support National Walk Safely to School Day in a bid to boost community wellbeing and minimise traffic congestion.

The annual event, which is now in its 23rd year, calls for students across Australia to “put their feet first and journey towards a healthier future” on Friday, May 20 by walking to school with their parents and carers.

Held in conjunction with the National Road Safety Week from May 15-22, National Walk Safely to School Day aims to raise awareness of the health, road safety, transport and environmental benefits that regular exercise can provide to the long-term wellbeing of children.

Pedestrian Council of Australia Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Harold Scruby said the event offered alternatives to families who lived too far from schools to walk from home, suggesting they park their cars at least 10 minutes away from school and walk the rest of the way.

“The best exercise for all Australians is walking regularly. Children need at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day.” 

Harold Scruby 

“The extremely disturbing childhood obesity epidemic continues to affect one in four children at critical levels across Australia,” Mr Scruby said.

“The best exercise for all Australians is walking regularly. Children need at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day. We should encourage them to take a walk before school, during and at end of their day.”

Mr Scruby said some schools would also host a healthy breakfast at school to promote good nutrition and healthy eating.

National Walk Safely to School Day is on Friday, May 20. Visit www.walk.com.au for details.

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